Archive for the ‘Computers’ Category

Terrorists could use internet to launch nuclear attack: report

July 28, 2009

Terrorists groups could soon use the internet to help set off a devastating nuclear attack, according to new research.

The claims come in a study commissioned by the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament (ICNND), which suggests that under the right circumstances, terrorists could break into computer systems and launch an attack on a nuclear state – triggering a catastrophic chain of events that would have a global impact.

Without better protection of computer and information systems, the paper suggests, governments around the world are leaving open the possibility that a well-coordinated cyberwar could quickly elevate to nuclear levels.

Report: China has more Web users than US has citizens

July 28, 2009

The number of Internet users in China is now greater than the entire population of the United States, after rising to 338 million by the end of June, state media reported Sunday.

China’s online population, the largest in the world, rose by 40 million in the first six months of 2009, the official Xinhua news agency reported, citing a report by the China Internet Network Information Center.

The number of broadband Internet connections rose by 10 million to 93.5 million in the first half of the year, the report said.

About 95 percent of townships were connected to broadband by early June and 92.5 percent of villages had telephone lines that could be used for Internet access, Xinhua said, citing the official data.

Google Analyzes Your Vacation Snaps to Figure Out Where You Were

June 24, 2009

Where were we when this was taken? Do you remember, dear?

Tired of trying to identify landmarks in your endless folders of travel photos? Google’s image recognition engine could help. Just upload the mystery image to an online album, point the engine at it, and zap — turns out it was the Acropolis, in Athens, Greece.

There’s no product just yet, but Google’s recognition engine has proven capable of identifying more than 50,000 unique landmarks from around the world, and all “without any human intervention,” said Jay Yagnik, head of Google’s Computer Vision Research. His team is scheduled to present its work today at a computer vision conference in Miami, Florida.

Cyber security centre to be launched in Britain

June 15, 2009

The Government is to launch a national cyber security centre to help protect the UK from online attacks.

The centre will advise Whitehall departments and companies on defending against hacking by foreign powers, organised criminals and terror groups, the Guardian reported.

It will form the centrepiece of the new national security strategy to be launched by Prime Minister Gordon Brown later this month, sources confirmed.

Obama’s new war doctrine: ‘Cyber dominance’

June 1, 2009

The US military is moving ahead with plans to create its first “cyber command” designed to bolster America’s potential to wage digital warfare as well as defend against mounting cyber threats, officials said on Friday.

After President Barack Obama announced Friday his plans to overhaul cyber security policy, Defense Secretary Robert Gates was expected to soon formally propose the new cyber command that will be overseen by a four-star officer, Pentagon officials told AFP.

The move reflects a shift in military strategy with “cyber dominance” now part of US war doctrine and growing alarm over the perceived threat posed by digital espionage coming from China, Russia and elsewhere.

Obama Set to Create A Cybersecurity Czar With Broad Mandate

May 27, 2009

President Obama is expected to announce late this week that he will create a “cyber czar,” a senior White House official who will have broad authority to develop strategy to protect the nation’s government-run and private computer networks, according to people who have been briefed on the plan.

The adviser will have the most comprehensive mandate granted to such an official to date and will probably be a member of the National Security Council but will report to the national security adviser as well as the senior White House economic adviser, said the sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the deliberations are not final.

BBC Chief Demands Charge For iPlayer to Stop Viewers ‘Getting a Free Ride’

May 20, 2009

‘The BBC is looking to close the loophole which allows non-licence fee payers to watch programmes on iPlayer. The BBC’s technology chief said viewers were getting ‘a free ride’ by watching its shows on the internet-based iPlayer rather than on television. More and more viewers – particularly students – are thought to be watching BBC programmes on demand via iPlayer without having to pay for a TV licence.’

Pentagon Preparing For War With The Enemy: Russia

May 14, 2009

The Pentagon is a synecdoche for the Department of Defense and everything related to its activities is cloaked in the same euphemism, so when pressed the US will insist its new cyber warfare project is intended for defensive purposes only. Any nation which and people who have been on the receiving end of US Defense Department actions know better. The new US cyber warfare command, its rationale based on a supposed Russian threat emanating from a non-military incident in the Baltics over two years ago, will be used to cripple the computer systems of any nation targeted for direct military assault, thus rendering them defenseless, and will be particularly effective for space-based and Star Wars (missile shield, interceptor missiles) first strike plans.

UK ISPs refuse to play Internet copyright cops

May 13, 2009

The UK government is finalizing its approach to dealing with online copyright infringement. Internet disconnections have been publicly taken off the table, but UK creative industries are now lobbying hard for disconnection as the report nears completion. ISPs argue that better licensing and business models would do a better job of solving the problem.

Rupert Murdoch: “Internet Will Soon Be Over”

May 8, 2009

Billionaire media mogul Rupert Murdoch gave a strange response when asked about plans for mainstream news websites to charge for content, declaring, “The current days of the internet will soon be over.”

He was making reference to the fact that corporate media websites cannot continue to survive under their current failing business model.

The establishment media is dying and advertising revenue has plummeted as people turn to blogs and the alternative media for their news in an environment of corporate lies and spin.

This has forced sectors of the corporate media to charge the dwindling number of loyal readers they have left for news content, a practice which is set to become widespread according to Murdoch. This will only send more people over to the alternative media as the old organs of de facto state-controlled propaganda wither and die.

One tonne ‘Baby’ marks its birth

May 7, 2009