Archive for the ‘Surveillance’ Category

Cyber security centre to be launched in Britain

June 15, 2009

The Government is to launch a national cyber security centre to help protect the UK from online attacks.

The centre will advise Whitehall departments and companies on defending against hacking by foreign powers, organised criminals and terror groups, the Guardian reported.

It will form the centrepiece of the new national security strategy to be launched by Prime Minister Gordon Brown later this month, sources confirmed.

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Big Brother HAS gone too far … and that’s an ex-spy chief talking

June 3, 2009

The former head of MI6 has hit out at ’striking and disturbing’ invasions of privacy by the Big Brother state.

Sir Richard Dearlove, who led the Secret Intelligence Service from 1999 to 2004, claimed some were an ‘abuse’ of the law.

He attacked the ‘loss of liberties’ caused by expanding surveillance powers and described some police operations as ‘mind-boggling.’

The former spy chief joins a growing number of high-profile critics warning that individual freedom and privacy are being seriously eroded by the Government’s disproportionate efforts to guard against terrorism.

Homeland Security to scan fingerprints of travellers exiting the US

June 1, 2009

The US Department of Homeland Security is set to kickstart a controversial new pilot to scan the fingerprints of travellers departing the United States.

From June, US Customs and Border Patrol will take a fingerprint scan of international travellers exiting the United States from Detroit, while the US Transport Security Administration will take fingerprint scans of international travellers exiting the United States from Atlanta.

Biometric technology such as fingerprint scans has been used by US Customs and Border Patrol for several years to gain a biometric record of non-US citizens entering the United States.

FCC’s Warrantless Household Searches Alarm Experts

May 27, 2009

You may not know it, but if you have a wireless router, a cordless phone, remote car-door opener, baby monitor or cellphone in your house, the FCC claims the right to enter your home without a warrant at any time of the day or night in order to inspect it.

That’s the upshot of the rules the agency has followed for years to monitor licensed television and radio stations, and to crack down on pirate radio broadcasters. And the commission maintains the same policy applies to any licensed or unlicensed radio-frequency device.

Fury as Commons Denied DNA Vote

May 27, 2009

Jacqui Smith, the home secretary, has been warned that the government risks further damaging the public’s faith in politics after it emerged that plans for the police to keep innocent people’s DNA profiles for up to 12 years will become law without a Commons vote. Opposition parties and civil liberty groups united to condemn plans that are being steered through parliament while MPs are distracted by the expenses row.

The Man Who Beat Big Brother Britain

May 27, 2009

Police could be forced to destroy huge archives of surveillance photographs taken at protests, riots and football matches following a landmark judgment. Appeal Court judges ruled yesterday that a law-abiding arms trade activist had his human rights breached when police took photos of him at a protest and kept them on file. In a judgment that could change the way all UK police forces monitor protesters, the Metropolitan Police was told to destroy all pictures of Andrew Wood.

Who’s Watching You?

May 27, 2009

A new three part series looks at why the UK has become one of the most watched places in the world – with millions of CCTV cameras, a growing network of number plate recognition cameras, one of the largest DNA databases in the world and government plans for the basic details of all our phone calls e-mails, and every internet site we visit to be logged and kept.

GPS system ‘close to breakdown’

May 20, 2009

It has become one of the staples of modern, hi-tech life: using satellite navigation tools built into your car or mobile phone to find your way from A to B. But experts have warned that the system may be close to breakdown.

I’m not a traffic warden … call me a civil enforcement officer

May 20, 2009

It is the end of the road for parking attendants as we know them.

They are now called “civil enforcement officers” and come complete with new powers – and uniforms – thanks to the Traffic Management Act, introduced today.

Call to suspend ‘whole-body imaging’ at airports

May 19, 2009

Privacy advocates plan to call on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to suspend use of “whole-body imaging,” the airport security technology that critics say performs “a virtual strip search” and produces “naked” pictures of passengers, CNN has learned.

Children’s database launched

May 18, 2009

A database which holds the details of every child in the UK has become operational.

ContactPoint holds the name, ages, address and other information for an estimated 11 million youngsters in England for access by childcare professionals.

The £224 million system was set up following the death of Victoria Climbie, who was abused by her great aunt and her boyfriend, but has been hit by a series of delays and fears over security.

Patent for killer chip denied in Germany

May 15, 2009

A Saudi inventor’s proposal to insert semiconductors subcutaneously in visitors and remotely kill them if they misbehave will not be patented in Germany.

Court allows police to track vehicles with GPS

May 12, 2009

A Wisconsin appeals court ruled Thursday that police were within their constitutional authority when they placed a GPS tracking device on a vehicle belonging to a man accused of stalking.

The Reason Why the IBM/Lockheed Martin Census Worker Is On Your Doorstep or…IBM’s Dirty Census Laundry

May 12, 2009

From April 1st, 150, 000 census workers, part of a $700 million taxpayer-funded contract, will travel all known streets and roads to identify every living quarter where people live or could potentially live. Each structure also will receive Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates to make sure it is recorded in the right location.

Jacqui’s secret plan to ‘Master the Internet’

May 4, 2009

Spy chiefs are already spending hundreds of millions of pounds on a mass internet surveillance system, despite Jacqui Smith’s announcement earlier this week that proposals for a central warehouse of communications data had been dumped on privacy grounds.

The system – uncovered today by The Register and The Sunday Times – is being installed under a GCHQ project called Mastering the Internet (MTI). It will include thousands of deep packet inspection probes inside communications providers’ networks, as well as massive computing power at the intelligence agency’s Cheltenham base, “the concrete doughnut”.

Sources with knowledge of the project said contacts have already been awarded to private sector partners.

Humour/Sarcasm used as weapons against the Gov’t

April 29, 2009

Newspapers give thumbs down to Government claims on ID cards

Phone bills ‘will rise’ to pay for database

April 29, 2009

GOVERNMENT TO MONITOR ONE TRILLION COCK PILL EMAILS

April 29, 2009

THE government has outlined plans to monitor all of Britain’s email traffic, covering everything from penis enlargement to Lindsey Lohan straddling a Labrador.

The only internet traffic exempt will be Ministry of Defence communications, NHS data transfers and anything that comes to or from the inbox of an MP, even if it has a JPEG attachment entitled ‘Freaky Japanese Scat’.

Plan to monitor all internet use

April 27, 2009

Communications firms are being asked to record all internet contacts between people as part of a modernisation in UK police surveillance tactics.

The home secretary scrapped plans for a database but wants details to be held and organised for security services.

The new system would track all e-mails, phone calls and internet use, including visits to social network sites.