Archive for the ‘UK’ Category

Cops Taser Old Man For Sitting In Wrong Seat At Baseball Game

August 7, 2009

Yet another video has emerged of cops tasering someone for sitting in the wrong seat at a sports event. The victim this time was an old man attending an Oakland Athletics baseball game in Oakland California.

The man tased by cops was 62-year-old Thomas Bruso, who apparently was sitting in the wrong seat and was drinking alcohol. Police claimed that the man was not “complying” with attempts to arrest him so the crowd was cleared and he was tasered from behind.

Another man is seen being pushed down the stairs as the situation escalates.

Advertisements

UK ‘must slash defence spending’

June 30, 2009

The UK should consider slashing defence spending by up to £24bn and revisit plans to renew its Trident nuclear deterrent, a think-tank report says.

Britain cannot afford much of the defence equipment it plans to buy, the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) report says.

Its authors include former defence secretary Lord Robertson and the ex-Lib Dem leader, Lord Ashdown.

The government said it remained committed to renewing Trident.

Taser roll-out snubbed by police

June 24, 2009

A major extension of Tasers is being snubbed by some police forces in a blow to the Home Office plans to roll out the controversial non-lethal weapon, The Daily Telegraph can disclose.

At least two forces, including the country’s largest, have ruled out extending the stun guns to more officers while another two have still not made any decision.

Cyber security centre to be launched in Britain

June 15, 2009

The Government is to launch a national cyber security centre to help protect the UK from online attacks.

The centre will advise Whitehall departments and companies on defending against hacking by foreign powers, organised criminals and terror groups, the Guardian reported.

It will form the centrepiece of the new national security strategy to be launched by Prime Minister Gordon Brown later this month, sources confirmed.

Big Brother HAS gone too far … and that’s an ex-spy chief talking

June 3, 2009

The former head of MI6 has hit out at ’striking and disturbing’ invasions of privacy by the Big Brother state.

Sir Richard Dearlove, who led the Secret Intelligence Service from 1999 to 2004, claimed some were an ‘abuse’ of the law.

He attacked the ‘loss of liberties’ caused by expanding surveillance powers and described some police operations as ‘mind-boggling.’

The former spy chief joins a growing number of high-profile critics warning that individual freedom and privacy are being seriously eroded by the Government’s disproportionate efforts to guard against terrorism.

Obama Out-Bushes Bush on Preventive Detention

May 31, 2009

If George Bush had had the gall to propose changing the laws of the United States to allow people to be detained for long periods without even the intention of putting them on trial, progressives across the nation would be howling that the fascist hordes were at the gates. And they would be right. Even the do-nothing, scared-of-nearly-everything Congressional Black Caucus would be up in arms. George Bush and Dick Cheney empowered to imprison people without trial? Progressives everywhere would be justified in crying out against the threat to civilization as we know it. But when Barack Obama last week proposed the very same thing, preventive detention without trial, there was relative silence…

MI5 faces fresh torture claims

May 27, 2009

According to The Guardian newspaper, Mr Rahman says he was tortured over a two-year period in Bangladesh and two MI5 officers turned a blind eye to his treatment, leaving the room while he was severely beaten and return to resume their interrogation.

At one point he says his wife was held in the next room and Bangladeshi officers threatened to rape her.

Now drinkers must wait in ‘post office-style’ queues at their local pub

May 27, 2009

Drinkers in pubs are to be told to stand in a queue and banned from ordering more than two drinks at a time at the bar.

Rope barriers similar to those used in shops and post offices will be installed to keep customers in line.

The plan has been proposed following concern over disorder and violence in a town centre’s bars.

The two-drink limit is intended to curb binge-drinking and stop customers ordering large amounts of alcohol. In addition, customers would not be allowed to drink while queuing.

But critics say the ‘nanny state’ restrictions will end the convivial British tradition of drinkers buying rounds for their friends.

Fury as Commons Denied DNA Vote

May 27, 2009

Jacqui Smith, the home secretary, has been warned that the government risks further damaging the public’s faith in politics after it emerged that plans for the police to keep innocent people’s DNA profiles for up to 12 years will become law without a Commons vote. Opposition parties and civil liberty groups united to condemn plans that are being steered through parliament while MPs are distracted by the expenses row.

The Man Who Beat Big Brother Britain

May 27, 2009

Police could be forced to destroy huge archives of surveillance photographs taken at protests, riots and football matches following a landmark judgment. Appeal Court judges ruled yesterday that a law-abiding arms trade activist had his human rights breached when police took photos of him at a protest and kept them on file. In a judgment that could change the way all UK police forces monitor protesters, the Metropolitan Police was told to destroy all pictures of Andrew Wood.

State recruits an army of snoopers with police-style powers

May 26, 2009

A growing army of private security guards and town hall snoopers with sweeping police-style powers is being quietly established, the Daily Mail can reveal.

Under a Home Office-run scheme, people such as park wardens, dog wardens, car park attendants and shopping centre guards receive the powers if they undergo training, and pay a small fee to their local police force.

Their powers include issuing £60 fines for truancy and dropping litter, and being able to demand a person’s name and address on the street.

MPs quit – and blame the voters

May 22, 2009

MPs caught up in the expenses scandal blamed the anger of their constituents and the public backlash for their decision to quit Parliament.

In an astonishing outburst Mr Steen, who spent £90,000 on his second home, including big sums for lopping trees in its grounds, said that his critics were jealous because he lived in a large house. He blamed the Freedom of Information Act for his plight and asked what right the public had to interfere with his private life.

“I’ve done nothing criminal, that’s the most awful thing, and do you know what it’s about? Jealousy,” he told the BBC. “I’ve got a very, very large house. Some people say it looks like Balmoral. It’s a merchant’s house of the 19th century. It’s not particularly attractive, it just does me nicely.”

How MI5 Blackmails British Muslims

May 22, 2009

Five Muslim community workers have accused MI5 of waging a campaign of blackmail and harassment in an attempt to recruit them as informants. The men claim they were given a choice of working for the Security Service or face detention and harassment in the UK and overseas.

They have made official complaints to the police, to the body which oversees the work of the Security Service and to their local MP Frank Dobson. Now they have decided to speak publicly about their experiences in the hope that publicity will stop similar tactics being used in the future

Tagged for dropping sweets

May 21, 2009

A motorcyclist has told how he was electronically tagged for four months and given a 36-hour community order – for dropping mint imperials while riding.

Thomas Payne, 19, must be at home from 8pm till 6am under the terms of his ankle tag after police spotted the trail of sweets left by his Yamaha DT175.

A police charge notice said he had ‘intentionally and without authority or reasonable cause, caused sweets to be on a road, namely Lancaster Circus, in such circumstances that it would have been obvious to a reasonable person that to do so would be dangerous’ contrary to the Road Traffic Act.

Payne insists: “They were just falling out of my pocket. Because of the time they followed me for they said I should have known.”

Known Unknowns: Unconventional ‘Strategic Shocks’ in Defence Strategy Development

May 20, 2009

The United States Army War College as issued a document disussing how to prepare and react if there are riots within the US as a result of an economic collapse. Here are some quotes fromt the document itself. The full document can be viewed by clicking HERE.

The military must be prepared for a “violent, strategic dislocation inside the United States”, in the light of “unforeseen economic collapse”

It talks of “purposeful domestic resistance”, “pervasive public health emergencies” or “loss of functioning political and legal order”

“Widespread civil violence … would force the defense establishment to reorient priorities in extremis to defend basic domestic order and human security. An American government and defense establishment lulled into complacency by a long-secure domestic order would be forced to rapidly divest some or most external security commitments in order to address rapidly expanding human insecurity at home.”

“Under the most extreme circumstances, this might include use of military force against hostile groups inside the United States.

The document says that the Department of Defense would be the “enabling hub” for the continuity of political authority in a multi-state or nationwide civil conflict or disturbance“.

In plain non-Orwellian English, the military will control the country.

I’m not a traffic warden … call me a civil enforcement officer

May 20, 2009

It is the end of the road for parking attendants as we know them.

They are now called “civil enforcement officers” and come complete with new powers – and uniforms – thanks to the Traffic Management Act, introduced today.

Children’s database launched

May 18, 2009

A database which holds the details of every child in the UK has become operational.

ContactPoint holds the name, ages, address and other information for an estimated 11 million youngsters in England for access by childcare professionals.

The £224 million system was set up following the death of Victoria Climbie, who was abused by her great aunt and her boyfriend, but has been hit by a series of delays and fears over security.

Town halls hire citizen snoopers as young as SEVEN to spy on neighbours and report wrongs

May 18, 2009

Children as young as seven are being recruited by councils to act as ‘citizen snoopers’, the Daily Mail can reveal.

The ‘environment volunteers’ will report on litter louts, noisy neighbours – and even families putting their rubbish out on the wrong day.

There are currently almost 9,000 people signed up to the schemes. More are likely to be recruited in the coming months.

Fight for Oil: 100 Years in the Middle East

May 16, 2009

The history of the race for oil in the Middle East, and the conflict is caused between world powers in the 20th century, is explored in this documentary.

As the race for oil began Britain, Russia, The USA, Germany and France all began to lay claim to the land in the Middle East, bidding to control the natural resources and related wealth it provided.

Nobel Peace Prize winner and human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi gives her thoughts on the former Prime Minister of Iran, Mohammed Mossadegh, and his fight for independence from the world powers.

Britain’s influence on Iran and the Middle East, through the creation of monarchies, armies and parliaments, is explored, as well as the impact of its withdrawal from the region.

This is part of a series focusing on the history of oil and the conflicts it has caused, many of which continue today.

ID cards: taxman allowed access to personal data

May 16, 2009

Tax officials will be allowed access to personal data gathered for the controversial ID cards scheme, it has been disclosed.

HM Revenue and Customs staff will be able to examine people’s financial transactions on the scheme’s database and search for evidence of undeclared earnings or bank accounts.

The disclosure will likely to provoke further concern over the £5.5 billion project, which has been condemned as a waste of money and an invasion of privacy.

Charlie Veitch vs. Armed Police at USA Embassy London

May 15, 2009

Now demoralised police are sent on LITTER patrols in bid to hit performance targets

May 15, 2009

Police have been ordered to go on litter patrol in a bid to boost the number of people nicked for minor offences.

Officers will be forced to ditch their uniforms and go out undercover in plain clothes in an attempt to hit performance targets.

However cops are furious over the move – because they don’t even have the powers to issue on-the-spot-fines.

Instead, they will have to radio a PCSO – a lower ranking officer –  to attend the scene to slap the offender with a £50 to £80 penalty.

Undercover Spies Given Anti-Terror Powers To Stalk Dog Foulers & Litterbugs

May 15, 2009

UNDERCOVER poop snoops are set to stalk dog foulers and litter louts who blight streets and parks across Denbighshire.

New plain-clothed wardens have been given powers to respond to complaints and target persistent offenders.

Those who flick cigarette butts, drop rubbish or don’t clean up after their pets will be coming under the watchful eye of the county’s CCTV system – before being hit in the pocket.

Scouts Train to Fight Terrorists, and More

May 15, 2009

The Explorers program, a coeducational affiliate of the Boy Scouts of America that began 60 years ago, is training thousands of young people in skills used to confront terrorism, illegal immigration and escalating border violence — an intense ratcheting up of one of the group’s longtime missions to prepare youths for more traditional jobs as police officers and firefighters.

Police Encourage Citizens To Report People Who Drive Nice Cars

May 13, 2009

Police in the UK are encouraging citizens to report people who drive nice cars or buy expensive items to the authorities in a new campaign entitled, ‘Too Much Bling? Give Us a Ring’.

“The Gloucestershire force is encouraging members of the public to report people wearing too much ‘bling’ during the recession. They are also urging people to shop anyone who drives flash cars or buys expensive items without the apparent means to afford them during the credit crunch,” reports the Daily Mail.